Wednesday, February 23, 2005

The Bush Tapes

My brother, The Unintentional Blogger, wrote about the secretly taped conversations of President Bush, so I won't repeat much here. It's good to know that Bush recognizes he is, like the rest of us, a sinner and that he doesn't want to single out gays for that reason, although I can't fathom why he'd support a federal constitution amendment when the GOP is supposed to be about less government interference. I think this L.A. Times editorial sums up my biggest problem with Bush in its last line:

"I've sinned and I've learned" becomes his campaign mantra. He tells Wead, and now us, "That's part of my shtick, which is, 'Look, we have all made mistakes.' "

Odd that the same man, once in office, would be incapable of admitting them.

3 Comments:

At 5:35 PM, Blogger the-unintentional-blogger said...

I HATE when reporters or editorialists bring back up the "he doesn't admit he's wrong" thing. The question is such an obvious trap that I applaud Bush for not being fool enough to step into it. Sure, he could answer something that the media won't crucify him for, but then the media will whine that he wasn't as forthcoming with them as he should have been. And if he said something big like "we should have had more troops to begin with", then boy howdy, the press would have a field day. I think the high road is to not play that stupid game to begin with. I cannot honestly believe that people think that Bush thinks he's never made a mistake, but what's the sense in playing the medias game?

 
At 7:16 PM, Blogger Bad Methodist said...

I wasn't thinking of reporters, I was thinking of his speeches or anything. He just comes off to me as really arrogant because he never, ever admits he's been wrong in a decision he's made in the White House. That's bothered me for a while now.

 
At 7:46 PM, Blogger mosaic sue said...

I actually gained a bit of respect for the president when he admitted to Diane Sawyer -- I think it was Diane Sawyer -- that he had made some judgement mistakes, especially in his choice of words around certain issues (he mentioned "mission accomplished" and "dead or alive" as examples). I even gained a bit of respect for Mrs. Bush after he admitted getting grief from her after those remarks. Granted, those particular admissions did not include the biggies like mistakes in Iraq, WMDs, and his lack of coalition building. Still, it was something.

I would have to disagree with unintentional blogger's statement "I cannot honestly believe that people think that Bush thinks he's never made a mistake." Because up until I saw that interview, Bush had come across so cocky, so incredibly cocky, that I did believe he thought he was perfect. And he still comes across as arrogant.

I don't think admitting you are wrong is a trap or necessarily a bad thing. Whether you agree with his politics or not, when Kennedy admitted fault after the Bay of Pigs, his approval rating went through the roof. Similarly, Clinton's approval rating was at an all-time high even after his personal fiasco. There is something to be said about coming across as human.

 

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